Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

    We have a manual that explains all the features 

Record number 414625
Title Cuban Sugar Industry: Transnational Networks and Engineering Migrants in Mid-Nineteenth Century Cuba
Author(s) Curry Machado, J.M.
Source New York : Palgrave Macmillan - ISBN 9780230111394 - 278
Department(s) Technology and Agrarian Development
Publication type Scientific book (author)
Publication year 2011
Keyword(s) cuba - latijns-amerika - geschiedenis - agrarische geschiedenis - suikerindustrie - suiker - beplantingen - migranten - migrantenarbeid - interraciale relaties - immigranten - ontwikkeling - technologie - innovatie adoptie - industrialisatie - stoommachines - slavernij - agrarische handel - latin america - history - agricultural history - sugar industry - sugar - plantations - migrants - migrant labour - race relations - immigrants - development - technology - innovation adoption - industrialization - steam engines - slavery - agricultural trade
Categories Rural History of Central America
Abstract Technological innovation was central to nineteenth-century Cuba’s lead in world sugar manufacture. Along with steam-powered machinery came migrant engineers, indispensable aliens who were well rewarded for their efforts. These migrant engineers remained perennial outsiders, symbolic of Cuba's growing economic dependency, privileged scapegoats unconsciously caught up in the island's political insecurities. This book tells the story of a group of forgotten migrant workers who anonymously contributed to Cuba's development and whose experience helps illuminate both the advance of the Cuban sugar industry and the processes by which the island was bound into global commodity-driven networks of control, dependency, and resistance.
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