Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 415017
Title Repetitive discrepancy between espoused and in-use action theories for fishery intervention in Grand-Popo, Benin
Author(s) Kouevi, T.A.; Mierlo, B. van; Leeuwis, C.
Source International Journal of Learning and Change 5 (2011)2. - ISSN 1740-2875 - p. 114 - 138.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1504/IJLC.2011.044187
Department(s) Communication Science
WASS
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2011
Abstract In order to be able to adapt successfully to eco-challenges, interest in change-oriented learning is growing around the world. The authors of this paper aim to assess the occurrence of learning for effective action-taking in successive fishery problem-solving interventions in the municipality of Grand-Popo, South-Western Benin, where interventions aimed at fishery development have been taking place for several decades with limited outcomes. Case studies were examined to investigate learning by intervention parties from generation to generation of interventions, with reference to organisational learning theory. Historical analysis of intervention processes within their context based on document review, conversations and observations helped in describing and tracking the intervention processes and their outputs since the 1950s. Findings indicate some single-loop learning by some interventionists, but mainly continuing discrepancy between espoused and in-use intervention/action theories. The learning needed to improve the effectiveness of interventions is absent.
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