Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 416307
Title Morphological classification of plant cell deaths
Author(s) Doorn, W.G. van; Beers, E.P.; Dangl, J.L.; Franklin-Tong, V.E.; Woltering, E.J.
Source Cell Death and Differentiation 18 (2011). - ISSN 1350-9047 - p. 1241 - 1246.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/cdd.2011.36
Department(s) AFSG Quality in Chains
Horticultural Supply Chains
PE&RC
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2011
Keyword(s) innate immune-response - hypersensitive response - self-incompatibility - arabidopsis - autophagy - senescence - apoptosis - contributes - xylogenesis - mechanisms
Abstract Programmed cell death (PCD) is an integral part of plant development and of responses to abiotic stress or pathogens. Although the morphology of plant PCD is, in some cases, well characterised and molecular mechanisms controlling plant PCD are beginning to emerge, there is still confusion about the classification of PCD in plants. Here we suggest a classification based on morphological criteria. According to this classification, the use of the term ‘apoptosis’ is not justified in plants, but at least two classes of PCD can be distinguished: vacuolar cell death and necrosis. During vacuolar cell death, the cell contents are removed by a combination of autophagy-like process and release of hydrolases from collapsed lytic vacuoles. Necrosis is characterised by early rupture of the plasma membrane, shrinkage of the protoplast and absence of vacuolar cell death features. Vacuolar cell death is common during tissue and organ formation and elimination, whereas necrosis is typically found under abiotic stress. Some examples of plant PCD cannot be ascribed to either major class and are therefore classified as separate modalities. These are PCD associated with the hypersensitive response to biotrophic pathogens, which can express features of both necrosis and vacuolar cell death, PCD in starchy cereal endosperm and during self-incompatibility. The present classification is not static, but will be subject to further revision, especially when specific biochemical pathways are better defined
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