Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 417398
Title The Q fever epidemic in the Netherlands: history, onset response and reflection
Author(s) Roest, H.I.J.; Tilburg, J.J.H.C.; Hoek, W. van der; Vellema, P.; Zijderveld, F.G. van; Klaassen, C.H.W.; Raoult, D.
Source Epidemiology and Infection 139 (2011)1. - ISSN 0950-2688 - p. 1 - 12.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1017/S0950268810002268
Department(s) CVI Bacteriology and Epidemiology
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2011
Keyword(s) coxiella-burnetii - pregnant goats - outbreak - infection - herd
Abstract The 2007–2009 human Q fever epidemic in The Netherlands attracted attention due to its magnitude and duration. The current epidemic and the historical background of Q fever in The Netherlands are reviewed according to national and international publications. Seroprevalence studies suggest that Q fever was endemic in The Netherlands several decades before the disease was diagnosed in dairy goats and dairy sheep. This was in 2005 and the increase in humans started in 2007. Q fever abortions were registered on 30 dairy goat and dairy sheep farms between 2005 and 2009. A total of 3523 human cases were notified between 2007 and 2009. Proximity to aborting small ruminants and high numbers of susceptible humans are probably the main causes of the human Q fever outbreak in The Netherlands. In general good monitoring and surveillance systems are necessary to assess the real magnitude of Q fever.
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