Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 418093
Title Molecular epidemiology of Coxiella burnetii from ruminants in Q fever outbreak, the Netherlands.
Author(s) Roest, H.I.J.; Ruuls, R.C.; Tilburg, J.H.H.C.; Nabuurs-Fransen, M.H.; Klaassen, C.H.W.; Vellema, P.; Brom, R. Van den; Dercksen, D.; Wouda, W.; Spierenburg, M.; Spek, A.N. Van der; Buijs, R.; Willemsen, P.T.J.
Source Emerging Infectious Diseases 17 (2011)4. - ISSN 1080-6040 - p. 668 - 675.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1704.101562
Department(s) CVI Bacteriology and Epidemiology
CVI Infection Biology
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2011
Keyword(s) goats - history
Abstract Q fever is a zoonosis caused by the bacterium Coxiella burnetii. One of the largest reported outbreaks of Q fever in humans occurred in the Netherlands starting in 2007; epidemiologic investigations identified small ruminants as the source. To determine the genetic background of C. burnetii in domestic ruminants responsible for the human Q fever outbreak, we genotyped 126 C. burnetii–positive samples from ruminants by using a 10-loci multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analyses panel and compared them with internationally known genotypes. One unique genotype predominated in dairy goat herds and 1 sheep herd in the human Q fever outbreak area in the south of the Netherlands. On the basis of 4 loci, this genotype is similar to a human genotype from the Netherlands. This finding strengthens the probability that this genotype of C. burnetii is responsible for the human Q fever epidemic in the Netherlands
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