Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 418154
Title Modulation of human immune responses by bovine interleukin-10
Author(s) Hartog, C.G. den; Savelkoul, H.F.J.; Schoemaker, R.; Tijhaar, E.; Westphal, A.H.; Ruiter, T. de; Weg-Schrijver, Elise van de; Neerven, R.J.J. van
Source PLoS One 6 (2011)3. - ISSN 1932-6203 - 10 p.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0018188
Department(s) Cell Biology and Immunology
Biochemistry
WIAS
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2011
Keyword(s) t-cell proliferation - dendritic cells - necrotizing enterocolitis - human-milk - ifn-gamma - cytokine production - tgf-beta - sublingual immunotherapy - sequence identity - interferon-gamma
Abstract Cytokines can be functionally active across species barriers. Bovine IL-10 has an amino acid sequence identity with human IL-10 of 76.8%. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate whether bovine IL-10 has immunomodulatory activities on human monocytes and dendritic cells. Peripheral blood monocytes were isolated from healthy donors, and used directly or allowed to differentiate to dendritic cells under the influence of IL-4 and GM-CSF. Recombinant bovine IL-10 inhibited TLR induced activation of monocytes, and dose-dependently inhibited LPS-induced activation of monocyte-derived DCs comparable to human IL-10. By using blocking antibodies to either bovine IL-10 or the human IL-10 receptor it was demonstrated that inhibition of monocyte activation by bovine IL-10 was dependent on binding of bovine IL-10 to the human IL-10R. These data demonstrate that bovine IL-10 potently inhibits the activation of human myeloid cells in response to TLR activation. Bovine IL-10 present in dairy products may thus potentially contribute to the prevention of necrotizing enterocolitis and allergy, enhance mucosal tolerance induction and decrease intestinal inflammation and may therefore be applicable in infant foods and in immunomodulatory diets.
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