Staff Publications

Staff Publications

  • external user (warningwarning)
  • Log in as
  • language uk
  • About

    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

    We have a manual that explains all the features 

Record number 418921
Title From nucleosome to chromosome: a dynamic organization of genetic information
Author(s) Fransz, P.F.; Jong, J.H.S.G.M. de
Source The Plant Journal 66 (2011)1. - ISSN 0960-7412 - p. 4 - 17.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-313X.2011.04526.x
Department(s) Laboratory of Genetics
EPS
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2011
Keyword(s) histone variant h2a.z - 30-nm chromatin fiber - arabidopsis-thaliana - dna methylation - interphase chromosomes - in-vivo - nuclear architecture - insitu hybridization - regulatory regions - h4-k16 acetylation
Abstract Gene activity is controlled at different levels of chromatin organization, which involve genomic sequences, nucleosome structure, chromatin folding and chromosome arrangement. These levels are interconnected and influence each other. At the basic level nucleosomes generally occlude the DNA sequence from interacting with DNA-binding proteins. Evidently, nucleosome positioning is a major factor in gene control and chromatin organization. Understanding the biological rules that govern the deposition and removal of the nucleosomes to and from the chromatin fiber is the key to understanding gene regulation and chromatin organization. In this review we describe and discuss the relationship between the different levels of chromatin organization in plants and animals
Comments
There are no comments yet. You can post the first one!
Post a comment
 
Please log in to use this service. Login as Wageningen University & Research user or guest user in upper right hand corner of this page.