Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 419142
Title DNA Barcoding of Recently Diverged Species: Relative Performance of Matching Methods
Author(s) Velzen, R. van; Weitschek, E.; Felici, G.; Bakker, F.T.
Source PLoS One 7 (2012)1. - ISSN 1932-6203 - 12 p.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0030490
Department(s) Biosystematics
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2012
Keyword(s) mitochondrial-dna - phylogenetic trees - molecular markers - sequence data - identification - diptera - fish - diversity - selection - taxonomy
Abstract Recently diverged species are challenging for identification, yet they are frequently of special interest scientifically as well as from a regulatory perspective. DNA barcoding has proven instrumental in species identification, especially in insects and vertebrates, but for the identification of recently diverged species it has been reported to be problematic in some cases. Problems are mostly due to incomplete lineage sorting or simply lack of a ‘barcode gap’ and probably related to large effective population size and/or low mutation rate. Our objective was to compare six methods in their ability to correctly identify recently diverged species with DNA barcodes: neighbor joining and parsimony (both tree-based), nearest neighbor and BLAST (similarity-based), and the diagnostic methods DNA-BAR, and BLOG. We analyzed simulated data assuming three different effective population sizes as well as three selected empirical data sets from published studies. Results show, as expected, that success rates are significantly lower for recently diverged species (~75%) than for older species (~97%) (P
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