Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 419320
Title Effect of salt intensity in soup on ad libitum intake and on subsequent food choice
Author(s) Bolhuis, D.P.; Lakemond, C.M.M.; Wijk, R.A. de; Luning, P.A.; Graaf, C. de
Source Appetite 58 (2012)1. - ISSN 0195-6663 - p. 48 - 55.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1016/j.appet.2011.09.001
Department(s) Chair Sensory Science and Eating Behaviour
Product Design and Quality Management Group
Consumer Science & Intelligent Systems
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2012
Keyword(s) sensory-specific satiety - free-living humans - energy density - bite size - palatability - meal - satiation - consumption - viscosity - appetite
Abstract The effect of salt intensity on ad libitum intake of tomato soup was investigated when soup was served as a first course and as a second course. Also the effect of salt intensity in soup on subsequent sweet vs. savory choice of sandwich fillings was investigated. Forty-three healthy subjects consumed ad libitum a low-salt (LS), ideal-salt (IS) and high-salt (HS) tomato soup in both meal settings. The salt concentrations were selected on an individual basis, in a way that IS was most pleasant and LS and HS were similar in pleasantness. The ad libitum intake of IS soup was higher than that of LS and HS soup, and the ad libitum intake of LS soup was higher than that of HS soup. The meal setting, soup as a first or as a second course, did not affect ad libitum intake. Salt intensity in soup did not predict sweet vs. savory choice of fillings in grams or energy, although most sodium from fillings was consumed after intake of HS soup. In conclusion, a higher salt intensity lead to lower ad libitum intake of soup similar in palatability (LS vs. HS). In addition, salt intensity in soup does not predict sweet vs. savory food choice.
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