Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 420493
Title Varying disease-mediated selection at different life-history stages of Atlantic salmon in fresh water
Author(s) Eyto, E. de; McGinnity, P.; Huisman, J.; Coughlan, J.; Consuegra, S.; Megens, H.J.W.C.
Source Evolutionary Applications 4 (2011)6. - ISSN 1752-4563 - p. 749 - 762.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1752-4571.2011.00197.x
Department(s) Animal Breeding and Genetics
WIAS
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2011
Keyword(s) major histocompatibility complex - class-i locus - salar l. - genetic-variation - pathogen resistance - balancing selection - natural-selection - wild populations - local adaptation - climate-change
Abstract Laboratory studies on associations between disease resistance and susceptibility and major histocompatibility (MH) genes in Atlantic salmon Salmo salar have shown the importance of immunogenetics in understanding the capacity of populations to fight specific diseases. However, the occurrence and virulence of pathogens may vary spatially and temporally in the wild, making it more complicated to predict the overall effect that MH genes exert on fitness of natural populations and over several life-history stages. Here we show that MH variability is a significant determinant of salmon survival in fresh water, by comparing observed and expected genotype frequencies at MH and control microsatellite loci at parr and migrant stages in the wild. We found that additive allelic effects at immunogenetic loci were more likely to determine survival than dominance deviation, and that selection on certain MH alleles varied with life stage, possibly owing to varying pathogen prevalence and/or virulence over time. Our results highlight the importance of preserving genetic diversity (particularly at MH loci) in wild populations, so that they have the best chance of adapting to new and increased disease challenges as a result of projected climate warming and increasing aquaculture
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