Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 420620
Title Identifying charge and mass transfer resistances of an oxygen reducing biocathode
Author(s) Heijne, A. ter; Schaetzle, O.; Gimenez, S.; Fabregat-Santiago, F.; Bisquert, J.; Strik, D.P.B.T.B.; Barrière, F.; Buisman, C.J.N.; Hamelers, H.V.M.
Source Energy & Environmental Science 4 (2011)12. - ISSN 1754-5692 - p. 5035 - 5043.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c1ee02131a
Department(s) Sub-department of Environmental Technology
WIMEK
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2011
Keyword(s) microbial fuel-cells - anode-respiring bacteria - performance - electrodes - biofilm - mechanism - graphite - model
Abstract this study, we identified mass and charge transfer resistances for an oxygen reducing biocathode in a microbial fuel cell (MFC) by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The oxygen reducing biocathode was grown using nitrifying sludge as the inoculum. A standard model for charge transfer at the electrode surface combined with diffusion across a boundary layer was used. EIS measurements were performed under variation of both linear flow velocities and cathode potentials. Fitting the impedance data to the standard model at constant potential and different flow rates confirmed that increasing flow rate had no effect on charge transfer resistance, but led to a decrease in mass transfer resistance. From the variation in cathode potential at constant flow rate, a minimum in charge transfer resistance was found at 0.28 V vs. Ag/AgCl. The minimum in charge transfer resistance could be explained by the combined biochemical and electrochemical kinetics typical for bioelectrochemical systems.
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