Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 421761
Title In vitro fermentation of 12 dietary fibres by faecal inoculum from pigs and humans
Author(s) Jonathan, M.C.; Borne, J.J.G.C. van den; Wiechen, P. van; Souza Da Silva, C.; Schols, H.A.; Gruppen, H.
Source Food Chemistry 133 (2012)3. - ISSN 0308-8146 - p. 889 - 897.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodchem.2012.01.110
Department(s) Food Chemistry Group
Animal Nutrition
Adaptation Physiology
WIAS
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2012
Keyword(s) gastrointestinal-tract - colonic function - fatty-acids - polysaccharides - kinetics - starch - gas - fermentability - chromatography - degradation
Abstract In vitro fermentation of twelve dietary fibers by fecal inocula from pigs and humans were performed. The fibers included homoglucans, mannans, fructans, polyuronides, and complex heteroglycans. Gas production, short chain fatty acid production and fiber degradation products were monitored during fermentation. Human inoculum has more ability to ferment resistant starch and fibers containing uronic acids. In contrast, pig inoculum is able to ferment cellulose, which is hardly fermented by human inoculum. The sugar and linkage composition of the fibers has an important influence on fiber fermentation patterns. Fibers containing uronic acids induced the production of acetate, whereas fibers containing neutral sugars induced the production of propionate or butyrate. Fermentation of the fructans showed that molecular size could be an influential factor, and fermentation of complex heteroglycans showed that the arrangement of sugars in the molecules may also affect the fermentation patterns. This experiment also shows that monitoring of fiber degradation products is important for understanding how fibers are degraded during fermentation.
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