Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 421817
Title Association mapping of plant resistance to insects
Author(s) Kloth, K.J.; Thoen, H.P.M.; Bouwmeester, H.J.; Jongsma, M.A.; Dicke, M.
Source Trends in Plant Science 17 (2012)5. - ISSN 1360-1385 - p. 311 - 319.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tplants.2012.01.002
Department(s) Laboratory of Entomology
Laboratory of Plant Physiology
PRI BIOS Applied Metabolic Systems
EPS-2
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2012
Keyword(s) genome-wide association - arabidopsis-thaliana - specialist herbivores - complex traits - glucosinolate accumulation - generalist herbivores - signaling pathways - natural variation - systems biology - host-plant
Abstract Association mapping is rapidly becoming an important method to explore the genetic architecture of complex traits in plants and offers unique opportunities for studying resistance to insect herbivores. Recent studies indicate that there is a trade-off between resistance against generalist and specialist insects. Most studies, however, use a targeted approach that will easily miss important components of insect resistance. Genome-wide association mapping provides a comprehensive approach to explore the whole array of plant defense mechanisms in the context of the generalist–specialist paradigm. As association mapping involves the screening of large numbers of plant lines, specific and accurate high-throughput phenotyping (HTP) methods are needed. Here, we discuss the prospects of association mapping for insect resistance and HTP requirements.
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