Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 423630
Title “Everyone may think whatever they like, but scientists . . .”: Or how and to what end plant scientists manage the science-society relationship
Author(s) Mogendorff, K.; Molder, H. te; Gremmen, B.; Woerkum, C. van
Source Science Communication 34 (2012)6. - ISSN 1075-5470 - p. 727 - 751.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1075547011433887
Department(s) Methodical Ethics and Technology Assessment
Strategic Communication
Applied Philosophy Group
WASS
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2012
Keyword(s) public engagement - knowledge - discourse - biotechnology - food - lay - controversy - experts - people - media
Abstract In this study, the authors examine the performative functions of scientists’ discursive constructions of the science-society relationship. They use discursive psychology to analyze interviews with Dutch plant scientists and show that interviewees contrast the freedom of people in the private sphere with scientists’ responsibilities in the professional sphere to regulate “lay” access to science. To accomplish this, interviewees make claims about the scientific value of lay views only after they have displayed their tolerance of these views. Additionally, many interviewees refer to their own lay status in everyday life. Finally, the relationship between findings and recent science communication approaches is discussed.
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