Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 424855
Title Host–Pathogen Interactions
Author(s) Smits, M.A.; Schokker, D.J.
Source In: Systems Biology and Livestock Science / Pas, M.F.W., Woelders, H., Bannink, A., Chichester [etc.] : John Wiley and Sons - ISBN 9780813811741 - p. 247 - 276.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/9780470963012.ch10
Department(s) Livestock Research
CVI Infection Biology
Host Microbe Interactomics
Animal Breeding and Genetics
WIAS
Publication type Peer reviewed book chapter
Publication year 2011
Abstract The outcome of an infection is determined by numerous interactions between hosts and pathogens occurring at many different biological levels, ranging from molecule to population. To develop new control strategies for infectious diseases in livestock species, appropriate methodologies are needed allowing more integrated system-level analysis in order to get a coherent picture of host–pathogen interaction networks. The field of systems biology provides such new concepts and methodologies. The chapter describes the first steps in the application of systems biology to study the interaction between two highly interacting biological systems: the invading pathogen and the defending host. Several examples of the application of system biology in this area of infection biology are described. It is concluded that these new approaches may provide a sound innovative basis for improving the prevention and control of infectious diseases in farmed animals.
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