Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 424994
Title Neospora caninum and Toxoplasma gondii in brain tissue of feral rodents and insectivores caught on farms in the Netherlands
Author(s) Meerburg, B.G.; Craeye, S. de; Dierick, K.; Kijlstra, A.
Source Veterinary Parasitology 184 (2012)2-4. - ISSN 0304-4017 - p. 317 - 320.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vetpar.2011.09.001
Department(s) LR - Veehouderij en omgeving
LR - Backoffice
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2012
Keyword(s) dna - pcr - transmission - risk - dogs
Abstract We investigated the presence of both Neospora caninum and Toxoplasma gondii in 250 brain tissue samples from 9 species of feral rodents and insectivores caught on 10 organic farms in the Netherlands in 2004. Collected samples were conserved in 4% paraformaldehyde solution and analysed by real-time PCR. For N. caninum, 31 samples originating from 6 species tested positive (12.4%): common shrews (33.3%), wood mice (17.6%), harvest mice (16.7%), house mice (15.4%), white-toothed shrews (10.8%) and common voles (4.2%). For T. gondii, the overall contamination level was 4%, and only three species were found to be positive: house mice (9.0%), common voles (4.2%) and white-toothed shrews (2.0%). Most N. caninum infected samples (27/31; 87%) were found on farms where dogs were present. Due to the observation that rodents and insectivores can contract both parasites, they might function as indicator species for the parasitic load on farms.
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