Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 425400
Title Effects of Ionic Strength on the Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Diluted and Concentrated Whey Protein Isolate
Author(s) Butré, C.I.; Wierenga, P.A.; Gruppen, H.
Source Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry 60 (2012)22. - ISSN 0021-8561 - p. 5644 - 5651.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jf301409n
Department(s) Food Chemistry Group
VLAG
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2012
Keyword(s) milk
Abstract To identify the parameters that affect enzymatic hydrolysis at high substrate concentrations, whey protein isolate (1–30% w/v) was hydrolyzed by Alcalase and Neutrase at constant enzyme-to-substrate ratio. No changes were observed in the solubility and the aggregation state of the proteins. With increasing concentration, both the hydrolysis rate and the final DH decreased, from 0.14 to 0.015 s–1 and from 24 to 15%, respectively. The presence of 0.5 M NaCl decreased the rate of hydrolysis for low concentrations (to 0.018 s–1 for 1% WPI), resulting in similar rates of hydrolysis for all substrate concentrations. The conductivity increase (by increasing the protein concentration, or by addition of NaCl) has significant effects on the hydrolysis kinetics, but the reason for this is not yet well understood. The results show the importance of conductivity as a factor that influences the kinetics of the hydrolysis, as well as the composition of the hydrolysates.
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