Staff Publications

Staff Publications

  • external user (warningwarning)
  • Log in as
  • language uk
  • About

    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

    We have a manual that explains all the features 

Record number 425569
Title Intake of total, animal and plant protein and subsequent changes in weight or waist circumference in European men and women: the Diogenes project
Author(s) Halkjaer, J.; Olsen, A.; Overvad, K.; Jakobsen, M.U.; Boeing, H.; Buijsse, B.; Palli, D.; Tognon, G.; Du, H.; A, D.L. van der; Forouhi, N.G.; Wareham, N.J.; Feskens, E.J.M.; Sorensen, T.I.A.; Tjonneland, A.
Source International Journal of Obesity 35 (2011)8. - ISSN 0307-0565 - p. 1104 - 1113.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ijo.2010.254
Department(s) Chair Nutrition and Disease
VLAG
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2011
Keyword(s) physical-activity - dietary-intake - nutrition - cancer - metaanalysis - obesity - gain - fat - epidemiology - association
Abstract Background: As protein is considered to increase thermogenesis and satiety more than other macronutrients, it may have beneficial effects on prevention of weight gain and weight maintenance. Objective: The objective of this study is to assess the association between the amount and type of dietary protein, and subsequent changes in weight and waist circumference (WC). Methods: 89 432 men and women from five countries participating in European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) were followed for a mean of 6.5 years. Associations between the intake of protein or subgroups of protein (from animal and plant sources) and changes in weight (g per year) or WC (cm per year) were investigated using gender and centre-specific multiple regression analyses. Adjustments were made for other baseline dietary factors, baseline anthropometrics, demographic and lifestyle factors and follow-up time. We used random effect meta-analyses to obtain pooled estimates across centres. Results: Higher intake of total protein, and protein from animal sources was associated with subsequent weight gain for both genders, strongest among women, and the association was mainly attributable to protein from red and processed meat and poultry rather than from fish and dairy sources. There was no overall association between intake of plant protein and subsequent changes in weight. No clear overall associations between intakes of total protein or any of the subgroups and changes in WC were present. The associations showed some heterogeneity between centres, but pooling of estimates was still considered justified. Conclusion: A high intake of protein was not found associated with lower weight or waist gain in this observational study. In contrast, protein from food items of animal origin, especially meat and poultry, seemed to be positively associated with long-term weight gain. There were no clear associations for waist changes. International Journal of Obesity (2011) 35, 1104-1113; doi:10.1038/ijo.2010.254; published online 7 December 2010
Comments
There are no comments yet. You can post the first one!
Post a comment
 
Please log in to use this service. Login as Wageningen University & Research user or guest user in upper right hand corner of this page.