Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 425912
Title The Environmental Benefits and Costs of Genetically Modified (GM) Crops
Author(s) Wesseler, J.H.H.; Scatasta, S.; Fall, E.H.
Source In: Genetically modified food and global welfare / Carter, C., Sheldon, I., Moschini, G.C., Bingley, UK : Emerald Group Publishing (Frontiers of Economics and Globalization 10) - ISBN 9780857247575 - p. 173 - 199.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/S1574-8715(2011)0000010012
Department(s) Environmental Economics and Natural Resources Group
WASS
Publication type Chapter in scientific book
Publication year 2011
Abstract The widespread introduction of genetically modified (GM) crops may change the effect of agriculture on the environment. The magnitude and direction of expected effects are still being hotly debated, and the interests served in this discussion arena are often far from those of science and social welfare maximization. This chapter proposes that GM crops have net positive environmental effects, while regulatory responses focus mainly on environmental concerns, giving an unbalanced picture of the regulatory context. This unbalance supports the hypothesis that environmental concerns about GM crops have been politically instrumentalized and that more attention should be paid to regulatory responses considering the environmental benefits of this technology. It is also argued that a number of environmental effects have not yet been quantified and more research is needed in this direction.
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