Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 426287
Title Monitoring marine populations and communities: methods dealing with imperfect detectability
Author(s) Katsanevakis, S.; Weber, A.; Pipitone, C.; Leopold, M.F.; Scheidat, M.; Boois, I.J. de; Jansen, J.M.
Source Aquatic Biology 16 (2012)1. - ISSN 1864-7782 - p. 31 - 52.
DOI https://doi.org/10.3354/ab00426
Department(s) IMARES Ecosystemen
IMARES Vis
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2012
Keyword(s) estimating animal abundance - visual census techniques - capture-recapture data - line-transect surveys - change-in-ratio - reef fish - aerial surveys - harbor porpoise - phoca-vitulina - parameter-estimation
Abstract Effective monitoring of populations and communities is a prerequisite for ecosystem-based management of marine areas. However, monitoring programs often neglect important sources of error and thus can lead to biased estimates, spurious conclusions and false management actions. One such source of error is ‘imperfect detectability’, i.e. the inability of investigators to detect all individuals or all species in a surveyed area. Although there has been great effort to develop monitoring methods that account for imperfect detectability, the application of such methods in the marine environment is not as apparent as in other systems. Plot sampling is by far the most commonly applied method for biological monitoring in the marine environment, yet it largely ignores detectability issues. However, distance sampling, mark-recapture methods, repeated presence-absence surveys for occupancy estimation, and removal methods do estimate detection probabilities and provide unbiased estimates of state variables. We review these methods and the relevant tools for their application in studies on marine populations and communities, with the aim of assisting marine biologists and managers to understand the limitations and pitfalls associated with some approaches and to select the best available methods for their monitoring needs
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