Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 426975
Title Evolution of blind beetles in isolated aquifers: a test of alternative modes of speciation
Author(s) Leys, R.; Nes, E.H. van; Watts, C.H.; Cooper, S.J.B.; Humphreys, W.F.; Hogendoorn, K.
Source PLoS One 7 (2012)3. - ISSN 1932-6203 - 8 p.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0034260
Department(s) Aquatic Ecology and Water Quality Management
WIMEK
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2012
Keyword(s) subterranean diving beetles - mitochondrial-dna phylogeography - size-structured populations - sympatric speciation - western-australia - adaptive radiation - ecological speciation - mathematical-models - oceanic island - yilgarn region
Abstract Evidence is growing that not only allopatric but also sympatric speciation can be important in the evolution of species. Sympatric speciation has most convincingly been demonstrated in laboratory experiments with bacteria, but field-based evidence is limited to a few cases. The recently discovered plethora of subterranean diving beetle species in isolated aquifers in the arid interior of Australia offers a unique opportunity to evaluate alternative modes of speciation. This naturally replicated evolutionary experiment started 10-5 million years ago, when climate change forced the surface species to occupy geographically isolated subterranean aquifers. Using phylogenetic analysis, we determine the frequency of aquifers containing closely related sister species. By comparing observed frequencies with predictions from different statistical models, we show that it is very unlikely that the high number of sympatrically occurring sister species can be explained by a combination of allopatric evolution and repeated colonisations alone. Thus, diversification has occurred within the aquifers and likely involved sympatric, parapatric and/or microallopatric speciation
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