Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 427146
Title Genome-scale metabolic models: reconstruction and analysis
Author(s) Baart, G.J.; Martens, D.E.
Source Methods in molecular biology 107 (2012)29. - ISSN 1064-3745 - p. 107 - 126.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-1-61779-346-2_7
Department(s) Bioprocess Engineering
VLAG
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2012
Abstract Metabolism can be defined as the complete set of chemical reactions that occur in living organisms in order to maintain life. Enzymes are the main players in this process as they are responsible for catalyzing the chemical reactions. The enzyme-reaction relationships can be used for the reconstruction of a network of reactions, which leads to a metabolic model of metabolism. A genome-scale metabolic network of chemical reactions that take place inside a living organism is primarily reconstructed from the information that is present in its genome and the literature and involves steps such as functional annotation of the genome, identification of the associated reactions and determination of their stoichiometry, assignment of localization, determination of the biomass composition, estimation of energy requirements, and definition of model constraints. This information can be integrated into a stoichiometric model of metabolism that can be used for detailed analysis of the metabolic potential of the organism using constraint-based modeling approaches and hence is valuable in understanding its metabolic capabilities.
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