Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 427157
Title Reproductive Issues in Welfare-Friendly Housing Systems in Pig Husbandry: A Review
Author(s) Kemp, B.; Soede, N.M.
Source Reproduction in Domestic Animals 47 (2012)Suppl. 5. - ISSN 0936-6768 - p. 51 - 57.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1439-0531.2012.02108.x
Department(s) Adaptation Physiology
WIAS
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2012
Keyword(s) lactating sows - environmental enrichment - early-pregnancy - farrowing accommodation - hormonal profiles - estrus expression - food-deprivation - embryo survival - boar contact - weaned sows
Abstract In Europe, housing conditions of sows are currently changing, related with a larger emphasis on pig welfare. As a result, sows are and will be less kept in crates, but more so in loose housing systems (farrowing, lactation) and group housing systems (pregnancy, lactation, weaning-to-oestrus interval). These changes in housing conditions may affect reproductive functioning of the sows. Group housing of sows may decrease farrowing rate and litter size when stress levels rise or when feed intake in early pregnancy is not fully secured. Loose housing during farrowing results in an improved farrowing process, but may increase piglet mortality by crushing during early lactation. Further, group housing during lactation may increase the risk of lactational oestrus. Thus, new – welfare friendly – housing systems require increased attention to management to ensure optimal reproductive performance.
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