Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 427661
Title Immunization of cattle with Ra86 impedes Rhipicephalus appendiculatus nymphal-to-adult molting
Author(s) Olds, C.; Mwaura, S.; Crowder, D.; Odongo, D.; Oers, M.M. van; Owen, J.; Bishop, R.; Daubenberger, C.
Source Ticks and Tick-borne Diseases 3 (2012)3. - ISSN 1877-959X - p. 170 - 178.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ttbdis.2012.03.003
Department(s) Laboratory of Virology
PE&RC
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2012
Keyword(s) east-coast fever - theileria-parva - boophilus-microplus - tick vector - salivary-gland - bm86 antigen - vaccination - infection - transmission - gavac(tm)
Abstract Commercial vaccines based on the tick gut protein Bm86 have been successful in controlling the one-host tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus and provide heterologous protection against certain other non-target ixodid tick species. This cross protection, however, does not extend to the three-host tick R. appendiculatus, the vector of the protozoan parasite Theileria parva. When transmitted to cattle, T. parva causes the often fatal disease East Coast fever. Here, we used insect cell-expressed recombinant versions of the R. appendiculatus homologs of Bm86, named Ra86, to vaccinate cattle. We measured multiple fitness characteristics for ticks that were fed on cattle Ra86-vaccinated or unvaccinated. The Ra86 vaccination of cattle significantly decreased the molting success of nymphal ticks to the adult stage. Modeling simulations based on our empirical data suggest that repeated vaccinations using Ra86 could reduce tick populations over successive generations. Vaccination with Ra86 could thus form a component of integrated control strategies for R. appendiculatus leading to a reduction in use of environmentally damaging acaricides
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