Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 427818
Title Glasshouse vs field experiments: do they yield ecologically similar results for assessing N impacts on peat mosses
Author(s) Limpens, J.; Granath, G.; Gunnarsson, U.; Rydin, H.; Aerts, R.; Heijmans, M.M.P.D.; Hoosbeek, M.R.; Paulissen, M.P.C.P.; Breeuwer, A.J.G.
Source New Phytologist 195 (2012)2. - ISSN 0028-646X - p. 408 - 418.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-8137.2012.04157.x
Department(s) Nature Conservation and Plant Ecology
Earth System Science
CL - Ecological Models and Monitoring
WIMEK
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2012
Keyword(s) nitrogen deposition - sphagnum mosses - metaanalysis - peatlands - carbon - scale - responses - ecology - cycle
Abstract • Peat bogs have accumulated more atmospheric carbon (C) than any other terrestrial ecosystem today. Most of this C is associated with peat moss (Sphagnum) litter. Atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition can decrease Sphagnum production, compromising the C sequestration capacity of peat bogs. The mechanisms underlying the reduced production are uncertain, necessitating multifactorial experiments. • We investigated whether glasshouse experiments are reliable proxies for field experiments for assessing interactions between N deposition and environment as controls on Sphagnum N concentration and production. We performed a meta-analysis over 115 glasshouse experiments and 107 field experiments. • We found that glasshouse and field experiments gave similar qualitative and quantitative estimates of changes in Sphagnum N concentration in response to N application. However, glasshouse-based estimates of changes in production – even qualitative assessments – diverged from field experiments owing to a stronger N effect on production response in absence of vascular plants in the glasshouse, and a weaker N effect on production response in presence of vascular plants compared to field experiments. • Thus, although we need glasshouse experiments to study how interacting environmental factors affect the response of Sphagnum to increased N deposition, we need field experiments to properly quantify these effects.
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