Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 427835
Title The physics of tissue formation with mesenchymal stem cells
Author(s) Higuera, G.A.; Boxtel, A.J.B. van; Blitterswijk, C.A. van; Moroni, L.
Source Trends in Biotechnology 30 (2012)11. - ISSN 0167-7799 - p. 583 - 590.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tibtech.2012.07.007
Department(s) Biomass Refinery and Process Dynamics
VLAG
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2012
Keyword(s) bone-marrow - chondrogenic differentiation - mechanical-properties - bioreactor system - shear-stress - iron-oxide - in-vitro - expansion - proliferation - micro
Abstract Cells react to various forms of physical phenomena that promote and maintain the formation of tissues. The best example of this are cells of musculoskeletal origin, such as mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which consistently proliferate or differentiate under cues from hydrostatic pressure, diffusive mass transport, shear stress, surface chemistry, mechanotransduction, and molecular kinetics. To date, no other cell type shows greater receptiveness to macroscopic and microscopic cues, highlighting the acute sensitivity of MSCs and the importance of physical principles in tissue homeostasis. In this review, we describe the literature that has shown how physical phenomena govern MSCs biology and provide insight into the mechanisms and strategies that can spur new biotechnological applications with tissue biology.
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