Staff Publications

Staff Publications

  • external user (warningwarning)
  • Log in as
  • language uk
  • About

    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

    We have a manual that explains all the features 

Record number 428524
Title Efficiency of Agrobacterium rhizogenes-mediated root transformation of Parasponia and Trema is temperature dependent
Author(s) Cao, Q.; Camp, R. Op den; Seifi Kalhor, M.; Bisseling, T.; Geurts, R.
Source Plant Growth Regulation 68 (2012)3. - ISSN 0167-6903 - p. 459 - 465.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/s10725-012-9734-y
Department(s) Laboratory of Molecular Biology
EPS-1
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2012
Keyword(s) medicago-truncatula - gene-transfer - non-legume - plants - nitrogen - andersonii - nodulation - rhizobium - phaseolus - sequences
Abstract Parasponia trees are the only non-legume species that form nitrogen-fixing root nodules with rhizobium. Based on its taxonomic position in relation to legumes (Fabaceae), it is most likely that both lineages have gained this symbiotic capacity independently. Therefore, Parasponia forms a bridging species to understand the evolutionary constraints underlying this symbiosis. However, absence of key technologies to genetically modify Parasponia seriously impeded studies on these species. We employed Agrobacterium rhizogenes to create composite Parasponia andersonii plants that harbour transgenic roots. Here, we provide an optimized protocol to infect P. andersonii as well as its non-symbiotic sister species Trema tomentosa with A. rhizogenes. We show that the transformation efficiency is temperature dependent. Whereas the optimal growth temperature for both these species is 28 °C, the transformation is most efficient when co-cultivation with A. rhizogenes occurs at 21 °C. Using this optimized protocol up to 80 % transformation efficiency can be obtained. These robust transformation platforms will provide a strong tool to unravel the Parasponia–rhizobium symbiosis
Comments
There are no comments yet. You can post the first one!
Post a comment
 
Please log in to use this service. Login as Wageningen University & Research user or guest user in upper right hand corner of this page.