Staff Publications

Staff Publications

  • external user (warningwarning)
  • Log in as
  • language uk
  • About

    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

    We have a manual that explains all the features 

Record number 428965
Title Interaction effects between sender and receiver processes in indirect transmission of Campylobacter jejuni between broilers.
Author(s) Bunnik, B.A.D. van; Hagenaars, T.H.J.; Bolder, N.M.; Nodelijk, G.; Jong, M.C.M. de
Source BMC Veterinary Research 8 (2012). - ISSN 1746-6148
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1746-6148-8-123
Department(s) Quantitative Veterinary Epidemiology
CVI Diagnostics and Crisis
CVI Bacteriology and Epidemiology
WIAS
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2012
Keyword(s) swine-fever virus - drinking-water - netherlands - epidemic - quantification - salmonella - resistance - bacteria - evaluate - design
Abstract Background: Infectious diseases in plants, animals and humans are often transmitted indirectly between hosts (or between groups of hosts), i.e. via some route through the environment instead of via direct contacts between these hosts. Here we study indirect transmission experimentally, using transmission of Campylobacter jejuni (C. jejuni) between spatially separated broilers as a model system. We distinguish three stages in the process of indirect transmission; (1) an infectious "sender" excretes the agent, after which (2) the agent is transported via some route to a susceptible "receiver", and subsequently (3) the receiver becomes colonised by the agent. The role of the sender and receiver side (stage 1 and stage 3) was studied here by using acidification of the drinking water as a modulation mechanism. Results: In the experiment one control group and three treatment groups were monitored for the presence of C. jejuni by taking daily cloacal swabs. The three treatments consisted of acidification of the drinking water of the inoculated animals (the senders), acidification of the drinking water of the susceptible animals (the receivers) or acidification of the drinking water of both inoculated and susceptible animals. In the control group 12 animals got colonised out of a possible 40, in each treatment groups 3 animals out of a possible 40 were found colonised with C. jejuni. Conclusions: The results of the experiments show a significant decrease in transmission rate (beta) between the control groups and treatment groups (p <0.01 for all groups) but not between different treatments; there is a significant negative interaction effect when both the sender and the receiver group receive acidified drinking water (p = 0.01). This negative interaction effect could be due to selection of bacteria already at the sender side thereby diminishing the effect of acidification at the receiver side.
Comments
There are no comments yet. You can post the first one!
Post a comment
 
Please log in to use this service. Login as Wageningen University & Research user or guest user in upper right hand corner of this page.