Staff Publications

Staff Publications

  • external user (warningwarning)
  • Log in as
  • language uk
  • About

    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

    We have a manual that explains all the features 

Record number 429007
Title Signals of speciation within Arabidopsis thaliana in comparison with its relatives
Author(s) Alcazar, R.; Pecinka, A.; Aarts, M.G.M.; Fransz, P.F.; Koornneef, M.
Source Current Opinion in Plant Biology 15 (2012)2. - ISSN 1369-5266 - p. 205 - 211.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pbi.2012.01.002
Department(s) Laboratory of Genetics
EPS
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2012
Keyword(s) evolutionary history - natural variation - local adaptation - a-thaliana - self-incompatibility - genetic-basis - genome - lyrata - hybrid - plants
Abstract The species within the now well-defined Arabidopsis genus provide biological materials suitable to investigate speciation and the development of reproductive isolation barriers between related species. Even within the model species A. thaliana, genetic differentiation between populations due to environmental adaptation or demographic history can lead to cases where hybrids between accessions are non-viable. Experimental evidence supports the importance of genome duplications and genetic epistatic interactions in the occurrence of reproductive isolation. Other examples of adaptation to specific environments can be found in Arabidopsis relatives where hybridization and chromosome doubling lead to new amphidiploid species. Molecular signals of speciation found in the Arabidopsis genus should provide a better understanding of speciation processes in plants from a genetic, molecular and evolutionary perspective
Comments
There are no comments yet. You can post the first one!
Post a comment
 
Please log in to use this service. Login as Wageningen University & Research user or guest user in upper right hand corner of this page.