Staff Publications

Staff Publications

  • external user (warningwarning)
  • Log in as
  • language uk
  • About

    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

    We have a manual that explains all the features 

Record number 429586
Title Melanin biosynthesis pathway in Agaricus bisporus mushrooms
Author(s) Weijn, A.; Bastiaan-Net, S.; Wichers, H.J.; Mes, J.J.
Source Fungal Genetics and Biology 55 (2013). - ISSN 1087-1845 - p. 42 - 53.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1016/j.fgb.2012.10.004
Department(s) FBR Fresh Supply Chains
Food Chemistry Group
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2013
Keyword(s) quantitative trait locus - lecanicillium-fungicola - polyphenol oxidase - tyrosinase - expression - resistance - cloning - genes - metabolism
Abstract With the full genome sequence of Agaricus bisporus available, it was possible to investigate the genes involved in the melanin biosynthesis pathway of button mushrooms. Based on different BLAST and alignments, genes were identified in the genome which are postulated to be involved in this pathway. Seven housekeeping genes were tested of which 18S rRNA was the only housekeeping gene that was stably expressed in various tissues of different developmental stages. Gene expression was determined for most gene homologs (26 genes) involved in the melanin pathway. Of the analysed genes, those encoding polyphenol oxidase (PPO), the PPO co-factor L-chain (unique for Agaricus bisporus), and a putative transcription factor (photoregulator B) were among the highest expressed in skin tissue. An in depth look was taken at the clustering of several PPO genes and the PPO co-factor gene on chromosome 5, which showed that almost 25% of the protein encoding genes in this cluster have a conserved NACHT and WD40 domain or a P-loop nucleoside triphosphate hydrolase. This article will be the start for an in depth study of the melanin pathway and the role in quality losses of this economically important product.
Comments
There are no comments yet. You can post the first one!
Post a comment
 
Please log in to use this service. Login as Wageningen University & Research user or guest user in upper right hand corner of this page.