Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 430957
Title Industrial Wage Inequality in Latin America in Global Perspective, 1900-2000
Author(s) Frankema, E.H.P.
Source Studies in Comparative International Development 47 (2012)1. - ISSN 0039-3606 - p. 47 - 74.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12116-011-9091-2
Department(s) Rural and Environmental History
WASS
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2012
Keyword(s) income-distribution - technological-change - labor - argentina - education - brazil - trade - world - productivity - democracy
Abstract Standard economic theories of wage inequality focus on the factor-biased nature of technological change and globalization. This paper examines the long-run development of industrial wage inequality in Latin America from a global comparative perspective. We find that wage inequality was comparatively modest during the first half of the twentieth century, but rising much faster during the post-war era than in other industrial countries. In-depth analyses of wage inequality trends in Argentina, Brazil, and Chile confirm this pattern, but also reveal notable country peculiarities. In Argentina and Chile, trend breaks coincided with large political–institutional shocks while in Brazil, wage inequality increased unabated under the wage regulation policies of successive post-war administrations. We argue that without taking national policies with respect to education and the labor market into account, economic theory cannot explain “Latin American” patterns of wage inequality.
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