Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 431048
Title Soil as a filter for groundwater quality
Author(s) Keesstra, S.D.; Geissen, V.; Mosse, K.; Piiranen, S.; Scudiero, E.; Leistra, M.; Schaik, L. van
Source Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability 4 (2012)5. - ISSN 1877-3435 - p. 507 - 516.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cosust.2012.10.007
Department(s) Land Degradation and Development
Alterra - Soil physics and land use
Soil Science Centre
SS - Soil Physics and Land Use
Alterra - Centre for Water and Climate
WIMEK
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2012
Keyword(s) municipal waste-water - preferential flow - solute transport - mitigation strategies - lumbricus-terrestris - earthworm burrows - structured soils - land application - site preparation - vadose zone
Abstract The filtering function of soil is an important ecosystem service for groundwater and surface water protection. The efficiency of soils as a filter depends on the behaviour of pollutants in the soil and the hydrological transport processes. This paper aims to identify knowledge gaps in processes influencing pollutant behaviour in soils and their potential transport to groundwater. Currently most soil-filter function research is approached from two disciplines, one originating from agronomical/environmental sciences; one from more fundamental hydrological process research. Combining insights and approaches from both disciplines through collaboration could lead to better understanding of this complex system and enhance assessments of management strategy changes, both over the long term as well as in different climatic settings.
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