Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 431107
Title Biorefinery of microalgae for food and fuel
Author(s) Vanthoor-Koopmans, M.; Wijffels, R.H.; Barbosa, M.J.; Eppink, M.H.M.
Source Bioresource Technology 135 (2013). - ISSN 0960-8524 - p. 142 - 149.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biortech.2012.10.135
Department(s) Bioprocess Engineering
VLAG
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2013
Keyword(s) pulsed electric-field - ionic liquids - capillary-electrophoresis - microfluidic devices - gas-chromatography - stationary phases - orange juice - extraction - separation - proteins
Abstract Microalgae are a promising source for proteins, lipids and carbohydrates for the food/feed and biofuel industry. In comparison with soya and palm oil, microalgae can be grown in a more efficient and sustainable way. To make microalgae production economically feasible it is necessary to optimally use all produced compounds. To accomplish this focus needs to be put on biorefinery techniques which are mild and effective. Of the techniques described, Pulsed Electric Field (PEF) seems to be the most developed technique compared to other cell disruption applications. For separation technology ionic liquids seems most promising as they are able to both separate hydrophobic and hydrophilic compounds. But additional studies need to be evolved in the coming years to investigate their relevance as novel cell disruption and separation methods. We propose a complete downstream processing flow diagram that is promising in terms of low energy use and state of the art knowledge.
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