Staff Publications

Staff Publications

  • external user (warningwarning)
  • Log in as
  • language uk
  • About

    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

    We have a manual that explains all the features 

Record number 431437
Title Diversity and natural functions of antibiotics produced by beneficial and plant pathogenic bacteria
Author(s) Raaijmakers, J.M.; Mazzola, M.
Source Annual Review of Phytopathology 50 (2012). - ISSN 0066-4286 - p. 403 - 424.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1146/annurev-phyto-081211-172908
Department(s) Laboratory of Phytopathology
EPS-2
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2012
Keyword(s) complete genome sequence - cyclic lipopeptide production - pseudomonas-fluorescens pf-5 - imaging mass-spectrometry - secondary metabolite 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol - bacillus-amyloliquefaciens fzb42 - dose-response relationships - soil microbial community - bio
Abstract Soil- and plant-associated environments harbor numerous bacteria that produce antibiotic metabolites with specific or broad-spectrum activities against coexisting microorganisms. The function and ecological importance of antibiotics have long been assumed to yield a survival advantage to the producing bacteria in the highly competitive but resource-limited soil environments through direct suppression. Although specific antibiotics may enhance producer persistence when challenged by competitors or predators in soil habitats, at subinhibitory concentrations antibiotics exhibit a diversity of other roles in the life history of the producing bacteria. Many processes modulated by antibiotics may be inherently critical to the producing bacterium, such as the acquisition of substrates or initiation of developmental changes that will ensure survival under stressful conditions. Antibiotics may also have roles in more complex interactions, including in virulence on host plants or in shaping the outcomes of multitrophic interactions. The innate functions of antibiotics to producing bacteria in their native ecosystem are just beginning to emerge, but current knowledge already reveals a breadth of activities well beyond the historical perspective of antibiotics as weaponry in microbial conflicts.
Comments
There are no comments yet. You can post the first one!
Post a comment
 
Please log in to use this service. Login as Wageningen University & Research user or guest user in upper right hand corner of this page.