Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 431585
Title Understanding the effect of carbon status on stem diameter variations
Author(s) Swaef, T. de; Driever, S.M.; Meulebroek, L. van; Vanhaecke, L.; Marcelis, L.F.M.; Steppe, K.
Source Annals of Botany 111 (2013)1. - ISSN 0305-7364 - p. 31 - 46.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aob/mcs233
Department(s) Wageningen UR Greenhouse Horticulture
Horticultural Supply Chains
WUR GTB Gewasfysiologie Management en Model
PE&RC
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2013
Keyword(s) daily trunk shrinkage - fruit-growth - tomato leaves - matter production - transport model - sugar-transport - sap flow - plant - water - phloem
Abstract Background Carbon assimilation and leaf-to-fruit sugar transport are, along with plant water status, the driving mechanisms for fruit growth. An integrated comprehension of the plant water and carbon relationships is therefore essential to better understand water and dry matter accumulation. Variations in stem diameter result from an integrated response to plant water and carbon status and are as such a valuable source of information. Methods A mechanistic water flow and storage model was used to relate variations in stem diameter to phloem sugar loading and sugar concentration dynamics in tomato. The simulation results were compared with an independent model, simulating phloem sucrose loading at the leaf level based on photosynthesis and sugar metabolism kinetics and enabled a mechanistic interpretation of the ‘one common assimilate pool’ concept for tomato. Key Results Combining stem diameter variation measurements and mechanistic modelling allowed us to distinguish instantaneous dynamics in the plant water relations and gradual variations in plant carbon status. Additionally, the model combined with stem diameter measurements enabled prediction of dynamic variables which are difficult to measure in a continuous and non-destructive way, such as xylem water potential and phloem hydrostatic potential. Finally, dynamics in phloem sugar loading and sugar concentration were distilled from stem diameter variations. Conclusions Stem diameter variations, when used in mechanistic models, have great potential to continuously monitor and interpret plant water and carbon relations under natural growing conditions
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