Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 431743
Title Temporal classification and mapping of non-polyadenylated transcripts of an invertebrate iridovirus.
Author(s) Ince, I.A.; Özcan, K.; Vlak, J.M.; Oers, M.M. van
Source Journal of General Virology 94 (2013)1. - ISSN 0022-1317 - p. 187 - 192.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1099/vir.0.046359-0
Department(s) Laboratory of Virology
PE&RC
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2013
Keyword(s) chilo-iridescent-virus - singapore grouper iridovirus - frog virus-3 - family iridoviridae - proteomic analysis - dna polymerase - messenger-rnas - infected cells - genome - protein
Abstract The temporal expression of the 54 Chilo iridescent virus (CIV) virion protein genes was investigated by combining drug treatments that inhibit protein or DNA synthesis and an RT-PCR strategy particularly suitable for non-polyadenylated mRNAs. This method generates a uniform 3' terminus by ligation of a 5'-phosphorylated oligonucleotide to the 3' end of the transcript that is recognized by a complementary primer during RT-PCR. This analysis showed that CIV virion proteins are encoded by genes in all three predetermined temporal classes: 23 immediate-early, 11 delayed-early and seven late virion gene transcripts were identified and assigned to ORFs. Early transcription of many virion protein genes supports the notion that virion proteins may also play essential roles in the initial stages of infection. In addition, some of the early gene products present in the virion may reflect the intracellular path that the virus follows during infection.
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