Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 431974
Title Effects of plant species identity, diversity and soil fertility on biodegradation of phenanthrene in soil
Author(s) Oyelami, A.O.; Okere, U.V.; Orwin, K.; Deyn, G.B. de; Jones, K.C.; Semple, K.T.
Source Environmental Pollution 173 (2013). - ISSN 0269-7491 - p. 231 - 237.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.envpol.2012.09.020
Department(s) Chair Soil Biology and Biological Soil Quality
PE&RC
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2013
Keyword(s) polycyclic aromatic-hydrocarbons - volatile organic-compounds - microbial communities - grassland communities - contact time - rhizosphere - bioavailability - mineralization - pahs - microorganisms
Abstract The work presented in this paper investigated the effects of plant species composition, species diversity and soil fertility on biodegradation of 14C-phenanthrene in soil. The two soils used were of contrasting fertility, taken from long term unfertilised and fertilised grassland, showing differences in total nitrogen content (%N). Plant communities consisted of six different plant species: two grasses, two forbs, and two legume species, and ranged in species richness from 1 to 6. The degradation of 14C-phenanthrene was evaluated by measuring indigenous catabolic activity following the addition of the contaminant to soil using respirometry. Soil fertility was a driving factor in all aspects of 14C-phenanthrene degradation; lag phase, maximum rates and total extents of 14C-phenanthrene mineralisation were higher in improved soils compared to unimproved soils. Plant identity had a significant effect on the lag phase and extents of mineralisation. Soil fertility was the major influence also on abundance of microbial communities.
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