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Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 432061
Title Geographic scope of proximity effects among small life sciences firms
Author(s) Kolympiris, C.; Kalaitzandonakes, N.
Source Small Business Economics 40 (2013)4. - ISSN 0921-898X - p. 1059 - 1086.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11187-012-9441-0
Department(s) Management Studies
WASS
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2013
Keyword(s) research-and-development - knowledge spillovers - industrial-organization - biotechnology industry - localized knowledge - empirical-evidence - regional networks - social networks - silicon valley - innovation
Abstract A large number of studies have demonstrated that proximity effects from knowledge spillovers, network externalities and other forms of knowledge transfers among like firms are geographically bounded. However, only a few studies have measured the strength and geographic scope of such externalities and even fewer have done so for firms in very close proximity. In this study, we examine the size and geographic scope of proximity effects among all life science firms that have received Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grants in the US over a 23-year period while controlling for relevant regional and firm characteristics. From our empirical analysis, we conclude that proximity effects among nearby small life science firms are strong within one-tenth of a mile distance and are exhausted within a radius of 1.5 miles. By examining the location of all firms in the sample, we offer possible explanations for the narrow geographic scope of the measured proximity effects. We also explain the significance of such findings for academic research that seeks to understand the nature of spatial externalities and for public policy.
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