Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 432550
Title Sulphur levels in saliva as an estimation of sulphur status in cattle: a validation study
Author(s) Dermauw, V.; Froidmont, E.; Dijkstra, J.; Boever, J.L. de; Vyverman, W.; Debeer, A.E.; Janssens, G.P.J.
Source Archives of Animal Nutrition 66 (2012)6. - ISSN 1745-039X - p. 507 - 513.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1080/1745039x.2012.735081
Department(s) Animal Nutrition
WIAS
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2012
Keyword(s) rumen fluid - sheep - metabolism - sulfate - plasma - roughage - blood - feed - urea - cows
Abstract Effective assessment of sulphur (S) status in cattle is important for optimal health, yet remains difficult. Rumen fluid S concentrations are preferred, but difficult to sample under practical conditions. This study aimed to evaluate salivary S concentration as estimator of S status in cattle. Saliva and rumen fluid samples were collected from dairy cows (n = 16) as well as samples of different feedstuffs offered to the animals. The N and S concentrations were determined using the Dumas technique. The average dietary N and S content were calculated as well as N:S ratio of saliva, rumen fluid and diet. Salivary S concentrations could not predict rumen fluid or dietary S concentrations (p > 0.05). The log transformed salivary N:S ratio (x) could predict the rumen fluid N:S ratio (y) with a linear equation of y = 9.83 (±4.59) x + 0.39 (±4.56) (r = 0.497, p = 0.05), but left too much residual variation to serve as reliable predictor. Further research should investigate this relationship in the search for an S status estimator.
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