Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 433061
Title Dietary amino acids and the risk of hypertension in a Dutch older population: the Rotterdam Study
Author(s) Altorf-van der Kuil, W.; Engberink, M.F.; Neve, M. De; Rooij, F.J.A. van; Hofman, M.K.; Veer, P. van 't; Witteman, J.C.M.; Franco, O.H.; Geleijnse, J.M.
Source American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 97 (2013)2. - ISSN 0002-9165 - p. 403 - 410.
DOI https://doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.112.038737
Department(s) Chair Nutrition and Disease
Chair Nutrition and Health over the Lifecourse
VLAG
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2013
Keyword(s) food frequency questionnaire - blood-pressure - arginine intake - protein-intake - disease - trial - men - supplementation - association - intermap
Abstract Background: Inverse associations between dietary protein and hypertension have been reported, which may be attributed to specific amino acids. Objective: We examined whether the intake of glutamic acid, arginine, cysteine, lysine, or tyrosine was associated with blood pressure (BP) levels (n = 3086) and incident hypertension (n = 1810) in the Rotterdam Study. Design: We calculated BP levels in quartiles of amino acid intake as a percentage of total protein intake (% of protein) with adjustment for age, sex, BMI, smoking, alcohol intake, education, and dietary factors. Subsequently, we used Cox proportional models that included the same confounders to evaluate the associations between specific amino acid intake and hypertension incidence. Results: Glutamic acid contributed most to protein intake (21% of protein), whereas lysine provided 7%, arginine 5%, tyrosine 4%, and cysteine 1.5%. A higher intake of tyrosine (~0.3% of protein) was significantly related to a 2.4 mm Hg lower systolic BP (P-trend = 0.05) but not to diastolic BP (P = 0.35). The other amino acids were not significantly associated with BP levels in a cross-sectional analysis. During 6 y of follow-up (7292 person-years), 873 cases of hypertension developed. None of the amino acids were significantly associated with incident hypertension (HR: 0.81–1.18; P-trend > 0.2). Conclusion: Our data do not suggest a major role for glutamic acid, arginine, lysine, tyrosine, or cysteine intake (as % of of protein intake) in determining population BP or risk of hypertension.
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