Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 433936
Title Soil and freshwater and marine sediment food webs: their structure and function
Author(s) Krumins, J.A.; Oevelen, D. van; Bezemer, T.M.; Deyn, G.B. de; Hol, W.H.G.; Donk, E. van; Boer, W. de; Ruiter, P.C. de; Middelburg, J.J.; Monroy, F.; Soetaert, K.; Thébault, E.; Koppel, J. van de; Veen, J.A. van; Viketoft, M.; Putten, W.H. van der
Source Bioscience 63 (2013)1. - ISSN 0006-3568 - p. 35 - 42.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1525/bio.2013.63.1.8
Department(s) Laboratory of Nematology
Chair Soil Biology and Biological Soil Quality
Sub-department of Soil Quality
Biometris (WU MAT)
Land Dynamics
Resource Ecology
PE&RC
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2013
Keyword(s) global carbon-cycle - terrestrial ecosystems - real ecosystems - climate-change - biodiversity - stability - communities - limitation - patterns - sequestration
Abstract The food webs of terrestrial soils and of freshwater and marine sediments depend on adjacent aboveground or pelagic ecosystems for organic matter input that provides nutrients and energy. There are important similarities in the flow of organic matter through these food webs and how this flow feeds back to primary production. In both soils and sediments, trophic interactions occur in a cycle in which consumers stimulate nutrient cycling such that mineralized resources are made available to the primary producers. However, aquatic sediments and terrestrial soils differ greatly in the connectivity between the production and the consumption of organic matter. Terrestrial soils and shallow aquatic sediments can receive organic matter within hours of photosynthesis when roots leak carbon, whereas deep oceanic sediments receive organic matter possibly months after carbon assimilation by phytoplankton. This comparison has implications for the capacity of soils and sediments to affect the global carbon balance.
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