Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 433998
Title The biology of strigolactones
Author(s) Ruyter, C.P.; Al-Babili, S.; Krol, S. van der; Bouwmeester, H.J.
Source Trends in Plant Science 18 (2013)2. - ISSN 1360-1385 - p. 72 - 83.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tplants.2012.10.003
Department(s) Laboratory of Plant Physiology
PRI BIOS Applied Metabolic Systems
EPS-1
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2013
Keyword(s) arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi - lateral root development - polar auxin transport - tiller bud outgrowth - box protein max2 - axillary buds - germination stimulant - orobanche-minor - acts downstream - pisum-sativum
Abstract The strigolactones are rhizosphere signaling molecules as well as a new class of plant hormones with a still increasing number of biological functions being uncovered. Here, we review a recent major breakthrough in our understanding of strigolactone biosynthesis, which has revealed the unexpected simplicity of the originally postulated complex pathway. Moreover, the discovery and localization of a strigolactone exporter sheds new light on putative strigolactone fluxes to the rhizosphere as well as within the plant. The combination of these data with information on the expression and regulation of strigolactone biosynthetic and downstream signaling genes provides new insights into how strigolactones control the many different aspects of plant development and how their rhizosphere signaling role may have evolved.
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