Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 435461
Title The Fatter the Tail, the Fatter the Climate Agreement : Simulating the Influence of Fat Tails in Climate Change Damages on the Success of International Climate Negotiations
Author(s) Dekker, T.; Dellink, R.B.; Ketterer, J.
Source Munich : Center for Economic Studies & Ifo Institute (CESifo Working Paper 4059) - 40 p.
Department(s) Environmental Economics and Natural Resources Group
WIMEK
Publication type Scientific report
Publication year 2012
Abstract International climate negotiations take place in a setting where uncertainties regarding the impacts of climate change are very large. In this paper, we examine the influence of increasing the probability and impact of large climate change damages, also known as the ‘fat tail’, on the formation of an international mitigation agreement. We systematically vary the shape and location of the distribution of climate change damages using the stochastic version of the applied game-theoretical STACO model. Our aim is to identify how changes to the distributional form affect the stability of coalitions and their performance. We find that fatter upper tails increase the likelihood that more ambitious coalitions are stable as well as the performance of these stable coalitions. Fatter tails thus imply more successful, or ‘fatter’, international climate agreements.
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