Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

    We have a manual that explains all the features 

Record number 436830
Title Is beer consumption related to measures of abdominal and general obesity? A systematic review and meta-analysis
Author(s) Bendsen, N.T.; Christensen, R.; Bartels, E.M.; Kok, F.J.; Sierksma, A.; Raben, A.; Astrup, A.
Source Nutrition Reviews 71 (2013)2. - ISSN 0029-6643 - p. 67 - 87.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1753-4887.2012.00548.x
Department(s) Chair Nutrition and Health over the Lifecourse
VLAG
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2013
Keyword(s) to-hip ratio - body-mass index - density-lipoprotein cholesterol - moderate alcohol-consumption - randomized controlled-trial - middle-aged men - blood-pressure - weight-gain - waist circumference - risk-factor
Abstract A systematic review was conducted to assess the evidence linking beer consumption to abdominal and general obesity. Following a systematic search strategy, 35 eligible observational studies and 12 experimental studies were identified. Regarding abdominal obesity, most observational data pointed towards a positive association or no association between beer intake and waist circumference or waist-to-hip ratio in men, whereas results for women were inconsistent. Data from a subset of studies indicated that beer intake¿>¿500¿mL/day may be positively associated with abdominal obesity. Regarding general obesity, most observational studies pointed towards an inverse association or no association between beer intake and body weight in women and a positive association or no association in men. Data from six experimental studies in men, in which alcoholic beer was compared with low-alcoholic beer, suggested that consumption of alcoholic beer (for 21–126 days) results in weight gain (0.73¿kg; P¿
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