Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 442574
Title Going back to the roots: the microbial ecology of the rhizosphere
Author(s) Philippot, L.; Raaijmakers, J.; Lemanceau, P.; Putten, W.H. van der
Source Nature Reviews Microbiology 11 (2013)11. - ISSN 1740-1526 - p. 789 - 799.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nrmicro3109
Department(s) Laboratory of Phytopathology
Laboratory of Nematology
PE&RC
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2013
Keyword(s) arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi - bacterial community structure - disease-suppressive bacteria - gradient gel-electrophoresis - plant-herbivore interactions - elevated atmospheric co2 - soil-borne pathogens - medicago-truncatula - food webs - arabidopsis-thaliana
Abstract The rhizosphere is the interface between plant roots and soil where interactions among a myriad of microorganisms and invertebrates affect biogeochemical cycling, plant growth and tolerance to biotic and abiotic stress. The rhizosphere is intriguingly complex and dynamic, and understanding its ecology and evolution is key to enhancing plant productivity and ecosystem functioning. Novel insights into key factors and evolutionary processes shaping the rhizosphere microbiome will greatly benefit from integrating reductionist and systems-based approaches in both agricultural and natural ecosystems. Here, we discuss recent developments in rhizosphere research in relation to assessing the contribution of the micro- and macroflora to sustainable agriculture, nature conservation, the development of bio-energy crops and the mitigation of climate change.
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