Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 443608
Title Nuclear power in China after Fukushima: understanding public knowledge, attitudes, and trust
Author(s) He, G.; Mol, A.P.J.; Zhang, L.; Lu, Y.
Source Journal of Risk Research 17 (2014)4. - ISSN 1366-9877 - p. 435 - 451.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13669877.2012.726251
Department(s) Environmental Policy
WASS
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2014
Keyword(s) environmental information disclosure - risk perception - climate-change - radioactive-waste - plants - uk
Abstract To meet the increasing demand for energy, the past decade has seen the revitalization of nuclear power technologies and many countries adopting nuclear power as a priority strategy in their energy policy. However, Japan’s Fukushima nuclear crisis, following the tsunami on 11 March 2011, challenged perceptions of much of the world’s nuclear power industry – but not in China. To explain how the future of nuclear power is decided in China, this study aims to understand the role of the public in the decision-making through exploring the current public knowledge of and trust in nuclear power, about which there is limited research compared to other environmental issues. Based on a questionnaire survey in Shandong province, this study concluded that, compared to many other countries with nuclear power, China had a different landscape of nuclear power information, knowledge, and trust. This paper helps to explain why the Chinese government is able to continue the development of nuclear power, without much public debate and participation.
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