Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 446052
Title Bending rigidities of surfactant bilayers using self-consistent field theory
Author(s) Leermakers, F.A.M.
Source Journal of Chemical Physics 138 (2013). - ISSN 0021-9606 - 11 p.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1063/1.4801327
Department(s) Physical Chemistry and Colloid Science
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2013
Keyword(s) interacting chain molecules - lipid-bilayers - curvature elasticity - statistical-theory - adsorption - membranes - size - thermodynamics - interface - relevance
Abstract Self-consistent field (SCF) theory is used to find bending moduli of surfactant and lipid bilayers. Recently, we successfully applied low-memory search methods to solve the SCF equations. Using these we are now able to directly evaluate the Gaussian bending modulus for molecularly detailed models of bilayers by evaluating the excess Helmholtz energy of tensionless bilayers in a (part of the) Im3m cubic phase. The result prompted us to reconsider the protocol that has been used thus far to find the mean bending modulus k c and Gaussian bending modulus k¯. With respect to previous predictions, the value of k c is reduced by a factor of two and the Gaussian bending modulus is less negative and much closer to zero. In line with experimental data we now find that k¯can also become positive. In this paper we use the non-ionic surfactants series of the type C n E m for illustration.
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