Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 447509
Title Birds exploit herbivore-induced plant volatiles to locate herbivorous prey
Author(s) Amo, L.; Jansen, J.J.; Dam, N.M. van; Dicke, M.; Visser, M.E.
Source Ecology Letters 16 (2013)11. - ISSN 1461-023X - p. 1348 - 1355.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1111/ele.12177
Department(s) Laboratory of Entomology
Animal Breeding and Genetics
PE&RC
WIAS
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2013
Keyword(s) dimethyl sulfide - insectivorous birds - neotropical forest - great tits - trees - food - attraction - insects - defense - attack
Abstract Arthropod herbivory induces plant volatiles that can be used by natural enemies of the herbivores to find their prey. This has been studied mainly for arthropods that prey upon or parasitise herbivorous arthropods but rarely for insectivorous birds, one of the main groups of predators of herbivorous insects such as lepidopteran larvae. Here, we show that great tits (Parus major) discriminate between caterpillar-infested and uninfested trees. Birds were attracted to infested trees, even when they could not see the larvae or their feeding damage. We furthermore show that infested and uninfested trees differ in volatile emissions and visual characteristics. Finally, we show, for the first time, that birds smell which tree is infested with their prey based on differences in volatile profiles emitted by infested and uninfested trees. Volatiles emitted by plants in response to herbivory by lepidopteran larvae thus not only attract predatory insects but also vertebrate predators.
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