Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 447980
Title Selective alteration of soil food web components by invasive Giant goldenrod (Solidago gigantea) in two distinct habitat types
Author(s) Quist, C.W.; Vervoort, M.T.W.; Megen, H.H.B. van; Gort, G.; Bakker, J.; Putten, W.H. van der; Helder, J.
Source Oikos 123 (2014)7. - ISSN 0030-1299 - p. 837 - 845.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1111/oik.01067
Department(s) Laboratory of Nematology
Biometris (WU MAT)
PE&RC
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2014
Keyword(s) exotic plant invasions - nematode communities - alien plants - ergosterol - biota - diversity - biodiversity - extraction - canadensis - feedbacks
Abstract Apart from relatively well-studied aboveground effects, invasive plant species will also impact the soil food web. So far, most research has been focusing on primary decomposers, while studies on effects at higher trophic levels are relatively scarce. Giant goldenrod Solidago gigantea, native to North America, is a widespread and common invasive species in most European countries. We investigated its impact on plant communities and on multiple trophic levels of the soil food web in two contrasting habitats: riparian zones and semi-natural grasslands. In 30 pairs of invaded and uninvaded plots, floristic composition, pH, fungal biomass and the densities of 11 nematode taxa were determined by using a quantitative PCR-based method. In the two habitats, the invader outcompeted both rare and dominant plant species. Belowground, S. gigantea invasion reduced pH, increased overall fungal biomass as well as the density of a single lineage of fungivorous nematodes, the family Aphelenchoididae. The densities of two other, phylogenetically distinct lineages of fungivorous nematodes, Aphelenchidae and Diphtherophoridae, were unaffected by the local increase in fungal biomass. Apparently this plant species induces a local asymmetric boost of the fungal community, and only Aphelenchoididae were able to benefit from this invader-induced change. The alternative explanation – the results are explained by a subtle, S. gigantea-induced 0.1–0.2 units decrease of pH – seems unlikely, as pH optima for nematode taxa are relatively broad. Thus, apart from readily observable aboveground effects, the invasive plant species S. gigantea affects fungal biomass as well as a specific part of the fungivorous nematode community in a soil type-independent manner.
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