Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 448515
Title Discrimination and Well-being: Testing the differential source and Organizational Justice theories of workplace aggression
Author(s) Wood, S.; Braeken, J.; Niven, K.
Source Journal of Business Ethics 115 (2013). - ISSN 0167-4544 - p. 617 - 634.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10551-012-1404-5
Department(s) Education and Competence Studies
WASS
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2013
Keyword(s) acute psychiatric-wards - mental-health - self-esteem - employment discrimination - emotional labor - verbal abuse - behavior - prevalence - incivility - customer
Abstract People may be subjected to discrimination from a variety of sources in the workplace. In this study of mental health workers, we contrast four potential perpetrators of discrimination (managers, co-workers, patients, and visitors) to investigate whether the negative impact of discrimination on victims’ well-being will vary in strength depending on the relative power of the perpetrator. We further explore whether the negative impact of discrimination is at least partly explained by its effects on people’s sense of organizational justice, and whether the strength of mediation varies according to the source of discrimination. Using survey data from 1,733 UK mental health workers, a structural equation model was designed to test these hypotheses following a bootstrap approach. Discrimination from all sources was related to well-being, with that from managers having the strongest effects. The results support an explanation of the effect of discrimination on well-being in terms of organizational justice perceptions for discrimination from managers and from visitors, but less so for discrimination from co-workers or from patients. The study highlights the importance of differentiating amongst sources of discrimination at work and the salience of organizational justice perceptions in explaining the effects of discrimination from some sources.
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